Dietary Supplement May Help Block Postpartum Blues

Dietary Supplement May Help Block Postpartum Blues

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Postpartum blues is a healthy range of sadness that peaks on day 5 after giving birth in most women. Severe postpartum blues is a high-risk state for postpartum depression. A dietary supplement was designed to compensate for a temporary rise in a brain protein, monoamine oxidase A, which occurs on postpartum day 5. This study tested whether this dietary supplement reduces the sadness associated with the postpartum blues. Total levels of tryptophan and tyrosine in breast milk are not affected by this dietary supplement. Women received the dietary supplement over postpartum days 3–5 or received no supplement.Dietary supplements strengthen your body, dramatically reducing feelings of sadness and distress on postpartum day 5 which is the peak time when most women experience the postpartum blues.

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How we can help?

We have multiple highly qualified nutritionists that offer postpartum nutritional counseling that will help you not only to prevent postpartum depression through targeted nutrition and supplement advice, but also to:

  • Ensure healing and recovery from delivery with an adequate protein intake
  • Support a robust breast milk supply by meeting your calorie and micro-nutrient needs to develop a healthy and sustainable plan to reach your post-baby goals.
  • Ensure healing and recovery from delivery with an adequate protein intake
  • Support a robust breast milk supply by meeting your calorie and micro-nutrient needs
  • Develop a healthy and sustainable plan to reach your post-baby health goals

SCHEDULE YOUR POSTPARTUM APPOINTMENT TODAY | CALL 562 634 8812

 

What is Baby Blues?

Nearly 80 percent of women will experience an emotional roller coaster known as the ‘baby blues’ after giving birth.
Hormones that helped sustain a healthy pregnancy drop rapidly after giving birth and since hormones and emotions are closely connected, the hormonal upheavals can cause rapid mood changes as well as the feeling of being overwhelmed. The good news is that the baby blues go away as your body adjusts and you get used to your new role. But it’s natural to wonder if what you are feeling may be a symptom of something more serious. And considering that a huge percent of women do experience postpartum depression or anxiety, it’s also important to know when to seek professional help to feel better.

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How common is Postpartum Depression (PPD)?

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 11 to 20% of women who give birth each year have postpartum depression symptoms. This means that approximately 600,000 women get PPD each year in the United States alone.

 

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