Ovary Removal: WHAT TO EXPECT

Ovary Removal: WHAT TO EXPECT

What is an Oophorectomy?

Oophorectomy is the surgical removal of an ovary or ovaries. The surgery is also called ovariectomy. When oophorectomy involves removing both ovaries, it’s called bilateral oophorectomy. When the surgery involves removing only one ovary, it’s called unilateral oophorectomy.

Oophorectomy may be performed through an abdominal incision, laparoscopically, or vaginally at the time of hysterectomy. (uptodate.com)

What does ovary pain feel like?

According to VeryWellhealth.com, ovary pain, which is often felt in the lower abdomen, pelvis, or lower back, are related to ovulation and menstruation. A GYN problem like endometriosis or pelvic inflammatory disease, or even a medical condition affecting your digestive or urinary system can be to blame. This can make the diagnosis more difficult.

Are ovarian cysts dangerous?

Physicians recommend what is referred to as watchful waiting. According to ACOG, watchful waiting is a way of monitoring a cyst with repeat ultrasound exams to see if the cyst has changed in size or appearance. Your ob-gyn or other health care professional will decide when to repeat the ultrasound exam and how long this follow-up should last. Many cysts go away on their own after one or two menstrual cycles.

How to prepare

To prepare for an oophorectomy, your doctor may ask that you:

  • Drink a solution to clear your intestines the day before surgery
  • Stop eating the day before your surgery and limit liquids
  • Stop taking certain medications
  • Undergo imaging tests, such as ultrasound and computerized tomography (CT), to help surgeons plan for the procedure

Infertility

If you want to have children, talk with your doctor about your options. For some conditions, you may need only one ovary removed (unilateral oophorectomy). With the remaining ovary, you’ll still have a menstrual cycle and conceive naturally.

If both of your ovaries are removed (bilateral oophorectomy), but your uterus remains, you may be able to become pregnant using assisted reproductive technology. Ask your doctor to refer you to a fertility specialist who can review your options with you.

Life after an Oophorectomy

Whether your oophorectomy is an open, laparoscopic or robotic procedure depends on your situation. Laparoscopic or robotic oophorectomy usually offers quicker recovery, less pain and a shorter hospital stay. But these procedures aren’t appropriate for everyone, and in some cases, surgery that begins as laparoscopic may need to be converted to an open procedure during the operation.

After an oophorectomy, you can expect to:

  • Spend time in a recovery room as your anesthesia wears off
  • Move to a hospital room where you may spend a few hours to a few days, depending on your procedure
  • Get up and about as soon as you’re able in order to help your recovery

(Mayoclinic.org)

Are there risks to removing ovaries?

An oophorectomy is a relatively safe procedure. However, with any surgical procedure, there are risks involved. Risks of an oophorectomy include the following:

  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Damage to nearby organs
  • Rupture of a tumor, spreading potentially cancerous cells
  • Retention of ovary cells that continue to cause signs and symptoms, such as pelvic pain, in premenopausal women (ovarian remnant syndrome)
  • Inability to get pregnant on your own, if both ovaries are removed

(Mayoclinic.org)

Premature Menopause

If you haven’t undergone menopause, you will experience premature menopause if both ovaries are removed. This deprives the body of the hormones, such as estrogen and progesterone, produced in the ovaries, leading to complications such as:

  • Menopause signs and symptoms, such as hot flashes and vaginal dryness
  • Depression or anxiety
  • Heart disease
  • Memory problems
  • Decreased sex drive
  • Osteoporosis

Are there risks to removing ovaries?

An oophorectomy is a relatively safe procedure. However, with any surgical procedure, there are risks involved. Risks of an oophorectomy include the following:

  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Damage to nearby organs
  • Rupture of a tumor, spreading potentially cancerous cells
  • Retention of ovary cells that continue to cause signs and symptoms, such as pelvic pain, in premenopausal women (ovarian remnant syndrome)
  • Inability to get pregnant on your own, if both ovaries are removed

Sign up for updates!!

Get news from Complete Women Care in your inbox.

By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Complete Women Care, 3711 LONG BEACH BLVD #700, LONG BEACH, CA, 90807, US, https://www.completewomencare.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact.

 
Call Now Button